Strathmore , Chestermere and Airdrie Realtor

Cell: 403-561-0037 |

I have listed a new property at 828 Bayview RD in Strathmore.
Many UPGRADES,Roof plus roof on garage ,newer windows, drywalled throughout. DOUBLE GARAGE(22X20.1). Front drive access. As you enter A 3 SIDED SUN ROOM for the entrance to your home. Massive living room with bright sunny double therm vinyl windows. kitchen has ample cabinets and PANTRY with separate dining room. BI china cabinet for extra storage. Kitchen also houses a BI SHOWCASE CABINET. Newer counter tops and back splash. All 1 year EXTERIOR DOORS. SEPARATE LAUNDRY ROOM. Loads of storage space and cabinets. 2 full bathrooms. MASTER bedroom is large and will accommodate a KING BED and furniture, 3 pce ensuite bath with newer DUEL FLUSH toilet and LARGE SOAKER TUB. SECOND BEDROOM is roomy. fenced and gated front and back. 5 yr furnace, 3 exit doors, HWT apx. 10 yrs. Newer OVERHEAD 9' GARAGE DOOR WITH GAS LINE. Under home is a crawl space with ladder to access it. All this and backs onto view of pond, canal and walkways. Newer garage shingles 1 month ago, Lifetime shingles on house
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People are still Buying and Selling Homes  in Strathmore.  1/3 are the only ones are complaining are the ones who don't want to work. 1/3 are listing properties at high in price just to get listing. The other 1/3 are listing properties to SELL . Some Clients fall for the trap of listing their homes at a high price hoping to sell their Property in Strathmore because the Realtor doesn't want to loose the listing. When trying to sell your home in a small town  in Strathmore or surrounding area Buyers can do their research on the internet and know you are over priced. Would you buy a house that is over priced. Or do you ask your Realtor MLS comparison so you can make you own judgement Or you Trust your Agent to tell the truth.
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Chapter 13
Selling your Home in a Divorce

13 FINDING BUYERS

The two most valuable tools for finding ready buyers are an online marketing plan that is aggressive and the previously covered strategic pricing.

You now understand the importance of pricing and how real estate is mostly technology-driven, so how do you find buyers?

According to recent National Association of Realtors® surveys, 36% of home buyers found the home they purchased on the Internet FIRST.

Real estate agents were consulted at the same rate as the Internet, but they were not the first choice of buyers.

A mere 2% found homes in the local newspaper.

Nine out of ten home shoppers use the Internet to search for properties using syndicated realty websites.

Your home can be seen from anywhere, but don't rely on exposure alone.

Smart agents will feature your home on websites directed at buyers.

The websites' search functions should be able to filter results by using criteria such as schools,neighborhoods, and subdivisions.

Not only do buyers look for a house, they also search for a place that fits their lifestyle.

The dedicated website should provide a wealth of information to buyers regarding proximity to schools, shopping centers, restaurants, and entertainment.

This is an excellent way to find interested buyers.

When a buyer is deciding where to live, you want your home included in the search results.

A neighborhood consisting of senior citizens and retired people, without a designated school bus stop close by, would not suit a family with school-age children, even though the house might meet their other criteria

. A bachelor may not be interested in living near children and pets running around in the yards even though a two-story home with a garage was what he was looking for.

By design, websites should direct buyers to homes that meet their lifestyle, thus eliminating uninterested shoppers.

Your best option is to discuss aggressive online marketing with a real estate agent who would like to list your home.

You want to maximize your exposure as well as generate interest from your target market.

The CMA will help you price your home strategically, and your online presentation should bring you interested buyers.

Once you have an offer for your home, you must know how to negotiate.

The next section of this book covers power negotiating and avoiding mistakes during the sale process.

Image may contain: 1 person, smiling, living room, text and indoor
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Selling your house in a Divorce

Chapter 12


AVOID COSTLY MISTAKES

How do you avoid selling your house for less than it is worth?


How do you avoid losing money on your sale?

The first thing that you need to do is find out what other people have done wrong.

Here are some examples of costly mistakes, including mistakes made by banks.

The final story demonstrates how pricing your home right the first time is crucial in a changing market.

Under Pricing Is the Easiest Way to Lose Money on Your

Home Sale

The number one reason people lose money on their home sale is underpricing.

They think their home is worth 'x' dollars without researching the value.

They put their house on the market, sell it for less than it's worth, and never realize their mistake.
That is why it is so critical you have a real understanding of the value of your home in today's market.

A perfect example is the sellers who sold three acres -worth about $800,000 - for $580,000.

⦁ They lived about 30 miles away and didn't realize the development potential the property had.

⦁ They hired an agent who wasn't familiar with the area.

⦁ Their agent didn't realize the development potential

either.

Their buyer was knowledgeable and experienced with developments.

He researched the zoning and discovered the three acres were zoned for high-density condos.

The sellers did not know about the zoning, neither did they know the county was planning to build a new road right past their property.

Bank Mistake

Banks know if a buyer makes an unsolicited offer, most of the time the offer is below fair market value.

In one case, a bank lost more than $30,000 on a mistake based on that assumption.

Two people were interested in buying a particular piece of property.

It was in an excellent location and unique among properties available in the area.

Both buyers were anxious to make an offer before someone else could offer more.

Either one of them would have been willing to pay the fair market value of $600,000 for the property.

Money was no problem; both buyers had the ability to pay in cash.

Unfortunately, the bank refused to take any offers on the property.

They would not budge until it was listed on the open market. For some reason, possibly an oversight, they put the property on the market for $567,000.

First, the bank underpriced the property by $33,000.

Second, the hired agent did not market it properly.

Errors were made in the MLS listing.

As a result, it didn't show up in search results for other agents who had buyers looking for that type of property.

The address was incorrect.

As a result, the listing did not show up on any of the real estate websites that use a map display.

Finally, he neglected to put a sign on the property. (The person who eventually bought it lived down the road and drove past the property every day.)

After the bank refused to work with the buyers, each waited for the listing to appear.

When it did not show up in searches, they gave up.

Ultimately, both buyers moved on to find other pieces of land.

Meanwhile, the property sat on the market, unnoticed.

Because of the agent's errors, no interest was generated, and the property went into foreclosure.

The man who lived nearby knew the bank had been trying to foreclose on the property.

He did some research on the foreclosure at the courthouse. He found out the bank had successfully foreclosed on it.

Knowing it had to be listed somewhere, he went online and searched through all of the properties for sale until he found the listing.

To his surprise, it was priced well below the market.

Had the bank and agent not made mistakes, the two initially interested buyers would have made offers and likely started a bidding war.

There is a good chance the two buyers would have driven the price up to the fair market value.

Most bank-owned properties are priced below market for a reason.

Banks will discount homes they sell because they sit empty for months, and the banks typically have no knowledge of their condition.

The bank missed a full-price sale and lost $33,000! The property was acres of raw pasture.

There were no unseen problems with it.

The buyer had lived down the road from it for years and was very familiar with it

. He submitted their asking price, and the bank accepted it.

He saved $33,000 because the bank's agent didn't perform well and substantially underpriced the property.

The bank suffered a significant loss.

Errors in Price Adjustments Are Costly

There are times when pricing adjustments may need to be considered.

For instance, let's look at Tim and Sue's situation.

Comparable Home A: $768,000

Comparable Home B: $749,000

Tim and Sue's Home: $745,000

Comparable Home C$745,000

Comparable Home D: $733,000

Comparable Home E: $729,000

Tim and Sue appear to have priced their home competitively for the market Over the next month, the market changed.

Comparable Home A: Expired

Tim and Sue's Home: $745,000

Comparable Home B: $739,000 (Reduced Price)

Comparable Home C: $735,000 (Reduced Price)

Comparable Home D: Sold

Comparable Home E: Pending

Comparable Home F: $726,000 (New Listing)

Comparable Home G: $725,000 (New Listing)

Comparable Home H: $719,000 (New Listing)

Tim and Sue now have the highest price home in the area in their price range.

When a buyer looks at the comparable home prices, it is now the worst value proposition in the marketplace.

Most sellers, like Tim and Sue, do not know the market can shift so far and so quickly.

It cannot be stressed enough how important it is for you to price your home right the first time.

House D sold, and House E had a pending sale.

Why Do These Stories Matter to You?

Strathmore real estate

Moral of the story:

Anyone can lose money in the real estate market.

Any seller unfamiliar with the market risks selling their home for less than it is worth or losing a sale because of incorrect pricing at listing.

In most cases, sellers never even realize it.

See how important it is to know the true value of your home?

But pricing errors happen to private sellers.

Knowing the true value of your home protects you from settling for less money than you deserve.

 

 
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I have listed a new property at 813 westmount DR in Strathmore.
It's NOT a CONDO NO CONDO FEES.. Recently Painted .This home has 3 bedrooms on the 2nd floor plus total of 2.5 baths Separate Dining room . Close to Play ground as well as close to school. Basement has a extra bedroom that needs finishing. Single garage with a large back yard.
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Selling your home in a divorce

Chapter 11

COMMON MISTAKES SELLERS MAKE

Carefully read this list of mistakes so you don't make them yourself.

If setting a price was simple and straightforward, you would not need assistance in pricing your home correctly.

Save yourself time and money by avoiding these pitfalls.

Guessing Instead of Researching

Basing your home price on what the neighbor down the street has listed his home for is not a reliable way to go.

The Comparative Market Analysis is still your best source for setting an asking price.

If a home in your area sells for a low price, don't assume yours is worth the same amount.

Your home might have something to offer that the other one didn't.

Let the CMA be your guide with the advice of a real estate professional.

Hiring a Realtor Because They Suggest the Highest Listing Price

Choosing a real estate agent simply because they want to put a high price on your home is not in your best interest

They should know more about the market for your home than you do.

Pick an agent who can provide you with real numbers and solid marketing plans for your home.

The professional you hire to sell your home should be knowledgeable, trustworthy, and quick to answer any questions or concerns regarding the entire selling process.

Avoid this mistake by interviewing agents and selecting the one who offers sales data and a strategic listing price.

Subjective Pricing

Selling your home is a business transaction between a qualified buyer and yourself.

If you have enjoyed living in your home for years but have decided to move on, then don't let emotional attachments to the home affect how you price it.

The most objective price will come from the CMA provided by your real estate agent.

Memorable moments spent in your home are priceless, but they don't add more to the selling price.

It is also unrealistic to add dollars because of the labor spent making the house into your home.

By focusing on the CMA results and maintaining a "strictly business" attitude, you can keep emotions at bay.

First Day High-price Blues

The most crucial time for your home are the first 10 days on the market.

Once your home is on the MLS, you will see how much interest is generated.

If your price is too high, buyers will pass you by because the home is out of their price range.

By the time you decide to lower the price, they have moved on to other properties.

As your home sits on the market, buyers will wonder why the home hasn't sold, concluding that it is undesirable in some way.

Price it correctly from the start to generate interest and gain attention from buyers to sell faster.

Unrealistic pricing costs you more money in the long run.

Unrushed High Pricing
Even if you are not in a hurry to sell, it is not a wise move to "test" the market by listing your home at a high price to see how it goes.

Serious home shoppers may take months to find a new home, so they are continually looking for new listings, not ones that have been sitting on the market.

Thinking that the market will turn in your favor may not be reliable, either.

If prices in your area are dropping, you may lose money.

By pricing your home based on current market values, you can sell your home more quickly and for more money.

Price Dropping

Another pricing trap to avoid is insisting on a high price for your home far above other homes in the area.

If your home does not sell after three months, you might decide to lower the price.

That is okay in a stable or increasing market. But what if the market in your area is declining?

In that case, you may be forced to reduce the price even more in order to catch up to the falling market.

Price competitively from the first.

Don't hesitate to reevaluate your local market.

Work with your real estate agent to determine the fair market value of your home.

Next chapter to follow in a few days

 

 
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Selling Your Home in a Divorce
Chapter 10

10 HOW TO MARKET YOUR HOME

The primary purpose of this book is to provide insight on how to sell your home quickly and for more money.

The previous chapters were filled with do's and don'ts when getting a home ready for the market.

The goal of the upcoming chapters is to help you understand what determines price and market value of a home, specifically, your home.

Despite the term "buyer's market," it is important to understand that it is always a "seller's market."

Homes are a necessity.

We don't live in caves or nomadic tents.

Real estate is a commodity that will remain so for decades to come.

Your home is unique.

There is no other house exactly like it.

Whatever individuality you have created on your property makes it stand apart from your neighbors'.

Therefore, there are no set rules of when to sell or not, because homes are not sold from store shelves.

Your home's value will be based on similar homes purchased during a particular time, whether spring or fall, winter or summer.

No matter how much you study the market and its current supply and draw conclusions, the real estate market is greater than any one person can speculate.

No one person or real estate professional can conclude that the current market has complete control over the saleability of a specific home.

Bottom line is that you decide the asking price of your home. But how do you decide?

What is the best way to get online exposure?

Do professional photographs make a difference to online shoppers?

What more can be done to market your home?

The upcoming chapters answer these questions to help you sell your home for the best price.

The Price Is Right

A buyer of real estate is no different than a buyer of a painting or a bag of oranges.

The perception of value will always have a prominent seat during the sale, whether it is your home or the bag of oranges.

Perceived value and market value are not the same.

You need to know how to price your home strategically and correctly.

A Toronto realty agency reported that homes sold in August of 2013 within their first week on the market sold for an average of 2.08% above list price.

Homes that grew stale for months sold for an average of 11.53% below their original price.

As a seller, there are two things you must keep in mind as you determine your asking price:

⦁ Sentimentality has no dollar value.

Although you may have many emotional connections to your home, you must avoid placing a higher price on the property for sentimental reasons.

It is highly recommended that you set all emotions aside during the selling process.

Buyers look for cues to figure out your motivation to sell.

⦁ There is no direct dollar-for-dollar correlation between upgrade investment and market price.

If you spend $53,000 to renovate, don't assume you can add that amount to your asking price.

Don't be trapped by making your home the nicest, but also priciest, home for your area.

Market Price vs. Market

If you have a ready-to-buy, bank-qualified buyer who is willing to pay a price you will accept, that is referred to as "market price."

It is an objective fact without influence.

This transaction, once complete, will influence the market value of homes in your area.

You determine the price of your home by looking at comparable local sales provided by a professional real estate agent, your property's condition, and the current supply and demand.

What any piece of property might sell for based on features and benefits in a competitive market, the current supply, and demand of similar homes is its market value.

You might value your home at a higher price than what a buyer will pay or its true market price.

If demand for oranges increases, then they become more valuable, which can affect the price.

If the demand for bags of oranges decreases, the value can no longer influence the price.

Balanced markets will equalize market price and market value.

The perspectives of buyers and sellers also come into play when placing value on a home.

Let's say your home has an abundance of mature trees—a plus in your mind.

A buyer who loathes raking leaves will see that as a negative.

If you just spent $21,000 to replace your roof, you might think you can get a higher price, but buyers expect the roof to be in excellent shape.

Proximity to schools, bus routes, and medical facilities can also create value that certain buyers are willing to pay for.

Buyers look for the right deal, but what they are willing to pay or the bank is willing to finance has limits.

Strategic pricing is your greatest tool when selling your home
For Example:

A homeowner decides to place his home on the market and must decide on an asking price.

By rough estimate, the home's worth falls between $690,000 and $700,000.

There are many homes on the market, so what goes through mind when finding the "right price"?

⦁ "Leave room for negotiations" — Overpricing at $705,000, my home will not entice a buyer, but only makes comparable homes more desirable.

My home will most likely not sell.

⦁ "Price it according to 'worth'" — Buyers will lump the home with like-priced homes, knowing they can buy anytime for $695,000.

⦁ "Underpricing generates interest" — Underpricing at $680,000 will motivate buyers and perhaps create a bidding war.

But if not, I have derailed my goal of selling my home for more money.

When it comes to finding a buyer, pricing your home according to right data available in comparable real priced sales, is crucial to making the sale.

The Comparative Market Analysis is imperative to pricing strategically.

When you ask for one from a real estate professional like me, be sure to review the analysis, ask questions, and get explanations.

If completed correctly, this comparison report not only gives you a great listing price but also reduces the chance of your home being under-appraised.

If you have a well-priced home, you should be showing within the first couple of days on the market.

Offers should come in within weeks.

Remember This
If the perceived value of your home by a potential buyer is greater than the actual price, the more willing he is to buy.

The urgency to buy disappears the closer the price and perceived value are.

Selling by Showing Off

Before the Internet, cell phones, and the social media craze, buyers looking for a home perused the local multiple listing service (MLS) book that was filled with tiny, mostly grainy images of homes.

Photos of featured homes were larger and in color sometimes, but most were black-and-white, amateurish photos.

The photo was insignificant compared to the information provided below it Nowadays, the reverse is true.

Photographs have become the most effective "bait" to attract future homeowners.

Recent studies show that 89% of buyers use online tools to shop for homes before contacting a real estate agent.

They peruse the web, finding homes that appeal to them and then contact a Realtor.

What will make the best first impression?

Beautiful, engaging, crystal-clear photos of homes, inside and out. Getting your home sold quickly takes exposure.

Online marketing through photographs is one of the most important ways to market your home.

Listing photography is a great tool for showing off the best
features of your home.

Bright and colorful shots of welcoming spaces encourage buyers to imagine themselves comfortable and living happily in your home.
By focusing on the unique aspects of your home, like large rooms with great views or amazing architectural features, you can generate genuine interest.

Stage your home to give the appearance of space and light in every photo without distorting reality.

Go Professional

The decision to use a professional is an easy one.

Most real estate agencies will cover the cost of getting professional photos taken.

According to one agency, photos taken by a professional are more likely to sell a house within six months.

The difference in home-selling success rates between homes photographed by amateurs and those photographed by professionals are astounding.

On average, homes ranging from $800,000 to $899,000 that were photographed professionally sold for $23,000 more than the homes that weren't.

Homes in the $600,000 range averaged $16,500 more.

The sharpest photos also increased the saleabilityof the home, with 10% of the homes selling at or above the listing price 44% of the time.

Potential buyers want quality, high-resolution photos when they first go online to shop.

Current trends in visual media demand it, and so will they.

Finding a home is all about an emotional connection for younger buyers, much like their music and movies.

You are basically marketing your home
directly to buyers with an online photo presentation.

You need to wow them Statistics show that high-quality photos can do just that.

Maximum Targeted Exposure
When you hire an agent, they can place your listing on all major real estate portals such as prelist.com and Realtor.ca

Buyers flock there to find new listings.

The agent can also place your home on their dedicated website and their social media outlets.

In the average month, prelist.com alone captures 69% of traffic to real estate websites.

When you chose an agent to represent your home, make sure they can offer the maximum targeted exposure to potential buyers.

Check to see if they provide any of these other technical services to sell your home.

⦁ Visual maps such as Google Earth
⦁ Floor plans or 3-D floor plans
⦁ Video tours
⦁ Updates on buyer activity through agency
⦁ Electronic documents
⦁ Agency application
⦁ Social media exposure

music and movies.

You are basically marketing your home
directly to buyers with an online photo presentation.

You need to wow them Statistics show that high-quality photos can do just that.

Maximum Targeted Exposure

When you hire an agent, they can place your listing on all major real estate portals such as prelist.com and Realtor.ca

Buyers flock there to find new listings.

The agent can also place your home on their dedicated website and their social media outlets.

In the average month, prelist.com alone captures 69% of traffic to real estate websites.

When you chose an agent to represent your home, make sure they can offer the maximum targeted exposure to potential buyers.

Check to see if they provide any of these other technical services to sell your home.

⦁ Visual maps such as Google Earth
⦁ Floor plans or 3-D floor plans
⦁ Video tours
⦁ Updates on buyer activity through agency
⦁ Electronic documents
⦁ Agency application
⦁ Social media exposure

Next Chapter in a few Days

 

 
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I have listed a new property at 232 300 Marina DR in Chestermere.
Walking distance to Lake .Fantastic 2 bedroom upper floor condo located in desirable Chestermere Station. Open concept, corner unit with large windows and large island is ready to move in, or alternatively to have as a fully managed investment property with management in place. Built in 2012 this condo shows very well with neutral paint colour.In Suite Laundry. Builder size 860 SF. Assigned parking with potential to rent additional stalls and low condo fees make this a great starter home or investment property. The condo is just around the corner from a shopping area with groceries, restaurants and anything else you may need as well as steps away from the lake and paths making it a perfect location. An easy drive to Calgary via 16th Ave or 17th Ave in the NE. Walking Distance to all Amenities
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Selling your home in a Divorce
Chapter 9
Depersonalize

Remember the discussion on staging?

When readying your home to show to potential buyers, you must encourage them to visualize living in the home, but not YOUR home.

Removing all of your personal items such as photos, trophies, and collectibles is the process of depersonalizing your home.

Knickknacks and wall decor are also personal taste items that may distract buyers from seeing the home as theirs.

Carefully pack and store your treasured items out of sight.

Storage units that can be rented monthly are a good option.

Declutter and Discard

It is understandably inconvenient to live in your home without your "stuff' anywhere to be found.

Think of decluttering your home as interior curb appeal.

Any extra furniture or unnecessary items like books, magazines, CD collections, and hobby supplies all add weight and visual distraction in a room .

The more spacious your home appears, the more appealing it will be.

Minimize as much as you can without compromising your lifestyle.

You want the home shopper to SEE what your home has to offer, not to guess.


Make a Plan

•List each room of the house, noting the amount of clutter in each room, including closets.

•Declutter rooms one at a time, attacking from the least to the greatest.

•Clear out each room, keeping only essential items.

•Donate or discard clothes, decor, toys, and other items no longer used.

•Box up possessions that you want to keep but don't currently use and put them in storage.

•Remind yourself to keep surfaces clean and free of collected things.

Here is a room-by-room list:

•Kitchen — Clear the counters, leaving only three or four essential items.

Keep towels, dishrags, and potholders out of sight Soaps and cleaners should be stored under the sink.

Rarely used small appliances can be packed and put in storage.

Pack away teacups, serving dishes, and platters if you showcase them.

If you want to draw attention to decorative shelving, put a few pieces out for show.

Seasonal dishes and accessories should also be stored.

Remove any pest control traps or poison from the pantry and closets.

Appliances are not extra shelving or storage.

Buyers will not want to find the microwave used as a bread box or the oven as cookware storage.

•Bathrooms — Remove everything from the cabinets and drawers.

Keep what you need or will use and dispose of the rest.

Store prescription medications out of sight and out of reach.

Find a safe place for jewelry, keepsakes, and perfumes.

Store hair products and styling tools in the cabinets.

Make the bathroom look like it is rarely used.

•Bedrooms — The main focus is showcasing closet space.

Only hang clothes that you wear most often, and store the rest.

When it comes to clothing, we generally only wear 20% of the clothes we own 80% of the time.

•Dining Areas — Clear off any flat surfaces,including the dining table, leaving only subtle decor such as a vase of flowers.

•Living Areas — Living rooms, family rooms, and great rooms. Gather stacks of books, magazines, remotes, toys and gaming gadgets, and throws.

Again, clear all flat surfaces, packing away the unnecessary items and storing magazines and electronics in decorative bins.

Fold and drape throws on chairs.

•Office Space — Organization is the focus for office space. Overflowing shelves do not reflect useful space, just the opposite.

Keep all personal papers stored out of sight.

•Linen Closets — Organize and clean out Store seasonal blankets, clothes, and outerwear off-site. Keep linens to a minimum.

•Laundry Room - Whether your washer and dryer are in the basement, laundry room, or closet, you should make the room or area neat.

Organize what you keep with shelving or bins. Don't leave clothes on the floor. Store detergents, bleach, and softeners in cabinets.

Don't use the tops of the appliances for storage.

•Garage — Although cleaning the garage may be the most daunting of decluttering tasks, it can be as simple as getting rid of things you haven't touched in years.

Boxes of broken toys, useless sports gear, and rusty tools all seem to migrate to the dark corners of the garage.

This is the best time to donate or discard Other items like wall paint, extra tiles for the floor, and bicycles can be shelved or hung.

Pet items also need to be out of the way when a buyer comes by.

See the section on Pet Peeves on how to deal with pets while selling your home.

Deep Cleaning: Spotless Is the Name of the Game

Doing a thorough, deep cleaning of your home is vital. It works for people selling a car (they get more money), and it will work for you when selling your home.

Deep Cleaning: Now that the clutter is gone, move on to cleaning each room.

It makes sense to clean each room after you have removed the clutter.

Tidy each room from top to bottom. Be meticulous, especially in the kitchen and bathrooms.

Home buyers will open cabinets, pantries, and closets to assess their storage opportunities.

General List of To-do's:

•Get rid of the cobwebs from every corner of your home.

•Dust ceiling fans and lighting fixtures while you clean out the cobwebs.

Dust your blinds.

Wash the walls.

This is a must before repainting as well.

Clean all glass surfaces: mirrors, television screens, patio doors, and tables.

Polish all wooden surfaces.

Wipe down any leather furniture.

Clean out and reorganize kitchen cabinets.

Buyers will open them.

Attack all appliances with cleaning fervor.

Make them shine!

Sinks, toilets, tubs, showers, faucets, and countertops need to be impeccable.

All tiled areas, including grout, must be free of discoloration, stains, and mildew.

Clean the window treatments.

Wash the windows so that the natural light will enhance your living space.

Vacuum rugs, shampoo carpets, and mop floors thoroughly.

Kitchen and Bath: Focus on These High Impact Areas

The most important rooms in your home are the kitchen and bathrooms.

A kitchen can sell a house because it is the heart of a home, the place family and friends gather to enjoy one another's company.

Buyers will be turned off by dirt and grime, cooking smells, and stinky trash.

Clean all cabinet surfaces as well as under the sink.

Bathrooms are so important to Canadians that most homes have at least two or three.

As you work towards selling your home, it is imperative that the bathrooms are kept clean and odor-free.

Potential buyers might forgive a less than stellar child's room, but a questionable bathroom or kitchen could cost you a sale.

Pet Peeves

Pets are wonderful, but home buyers want to see your home without excited, barking dogs or friendly cats.

Pet dander and odors are not going to provide a positive viewing experience for them.

Some might have allergies, while others consider pets an unnecessary distraction.

Do your best to minimize the presence of your pets.

Dog dishes, cat litter boxes, and beds need to be clean at all times.

Pets should be relegated to cages or backyards while showing your home.

With all the staging work complete, you are ready to list and showcase your home.

In the next section, you will learn how to price your home.

A real estate professional is your best information source for how to sell your home quickly without lowering the price.

There is much to know about pricing, marketing, and negotiations when selling your home.

 

 
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UPGRADE WITH ROI IN MIND

Return on investment
Making upgrades to your home can be as easy as replacing the handset on your front door or as daunting as remodeling a kitchen or bath.

There are two things you must remember when updating your home to sell with regard to market value and return on investment.

What home improvements give you the best return on your remodeling dollar?

The return on investment is generally less than 100% in real estate, so the rule of thumb is "less is more."

In 2016, a remodeling publication said the best ROI improvement a home seller can make is insulating the attic space, with 116% return.

If your home is worth $1.1M and you spend $60,000 to revamp the kitchen, don't make the mistake of assuming that the investment will increase the value dollar for dollar.

The remodel may add value to the home, but the return in dollars spent will be around 50%.

Smaller upgrades like replacing outdated fixtures in the kitchen and bath are certainly worthwhile, but major remodeling of those rooms is not wise.

That's not to say you can ignore necessary repairs that a home inspector would red-flag or mortgage company would demand before issuing a loan to a buyer.

If you are facing major problems like a leaking roof or outdated electrical wiring, it may be not the best time to put your home on the market, so expect to give up concessions to the buyer.

Starting with the Basics

Every home that is listed should meet the basic expectations of any buyer.

Your home should have a sound roof, functioning gutters and downspouts, a foundation without cracks, a functioning heating and air-conditioning system, solid subflooring, and safe and secure electrical wiring.

With financer-mandated home inspections, any shortcomings may be required to be remedied to get the buyer's financing approved.

You do not need to undertake extensive remodeling projects to sell your home or to increase the value of your property.

Your property needs to be up to the standards of the neighboring homes.

What's important, though, is that you understand that the market value of your home is determined by the prices of homes recently sold in your area.

Remodeling your kitchen to outshine others may not get you more money for your home, especially if it exceeds the market value buyers are willing to pay.

You could spend more money than you will get back in return.

Mechanical Maintenance Is a Must

It is easy to get wrapped up in the more eye-pleasing aspects of getting a home ready to sell.

However, you should never overlook the upkeep of all the more mundane aspects of your home.

Take a close look at these mechanical features:

•electrical boxes and wiring

•natural gas lines

•plumbing

•central heating and air-conditioning system

If these components of your home are old, outdated, or not working correctly, you are lowering your home's appeal unless you are willing to reduce your price.

According to the National Association of Realtors®, 65% of home buyers surveyed wanted to be sure their new home had a working central air system.

Of the 31 mechanical features inquired about in the survey, this was the most important one across the board.

People want to purchase a home that reflects their aesthetic
tastes and lifestyles, but also one that is safe and sound.

Faulty electrical systems do not provide a feeling of safety.

Leaky plumbing arouses concerns of mold infestation and sewage problems.

These areas can require extensive work, but they are extremely important.

Overlook them in the preparation stage, and you run the risk of trouble later with inspections and appraisals.

Professionals should do most of the mechanical work-Having a professional inspection is a big plus to most buyers as well.

•Have a certified plumber inspect your entire water system for leaks.

Check the well and septic field if applicable.

•Hire an electrician to check your wiring.

•Call your local HVAC company and have their technicians perform a thorough service checkup.

•Contact your natural gas supplier and have them double-check the mechanics of your tank and lines.

There is an alternative to calling and arranging all the different inspections.

Certified home inspectors can usually cover all items related to mechanical issues and more.

They will be able to identify possible trouble spots you need to address.

Many buyers hire an inspector, so you may even be saving them a step.

Having antiquated wiring and plumbing replaced is not cheap.

If you do have mechanical issues and decide to sell your home as is, it may be necessary to negotiate with the buyer.

Replacing Appliances

There isn't any doubt that new appliances make an impact on buyers.

The National Association of Realtors® conducted a survey of buyers in the market over the past several years and found:

•Buyers were somewhat interested or interested in buying a home that featured new appliances.

•Roughly 17% of the respondents preferred stainless steel.

•The most important factor: Appliances were available.

•Most buyers who were unable to get their sought-after appliances said they would have been willing to pay, on average, nearly $2,000 more for them.

Potential buyers want appliances included and will pay more for them, especially if they are new or in excellent condition.

If you can afford it, new appliances might be what sets your house apart from the home for sale across the street.

f new appliances are a bit out of your reach, offer them your immaculately clean, and fully functioning existing ones.

Updating Hardware

Carefully inspect your bathroom and kitchen hardware. If it is unsightly or worn, it is best to replace it.

Put yourself in a buyer's shoes.

Your home will potentially be their new home.

Old, worn-out fixtures are not going to speak to them the way nice, shiny new hardware will.

Unless your knobs, pulls, handles, or hinges are broken, there is no real reason to replace them .

Get that new look simply by thoroughly washing, sanding, and painting them with spray paint made specifically for kitchen and bath hardware, making it cost-effective.

Check these hardware items closely and replace as needed:

•towel bars

•toilet paper holders

•door handles

•dated light fixtures

The goal is to touch up your home up nicely without excessive spending.

The Internet has a wealth of do-it-yourself videos that can help you update your bath and kitchen if your budget is limited.

If you do have broken or completely worn-out hardware, it's
best to replace the whole set.

If you can find matching pieces, you can paint the old and new to match.

You could also consolidate all the good parts in one bathroom and replace all the hardware in the other.

Other Inexpensive Ideas to Update the Bath and Kitchen:

•Buy a new toilet seat.

•Repair the grout in tile back splashes, floors, and tub surrounds.

•Refurbish tired-looking cabinets with fresh paint or finish.

•Replace a dated bathroom sink with a pedestal variety or cabinet sink.

Let There Be Light

Whether natural or artificial, bringing in light is one of the most effective ways to show off your home.

The part of staging that is often overlooked, using light to enhance your home's appeal, can make a difference.

Harsh light is unflattering even to the best furnishings and features.

Dim lighting gives everything in the house a dingy feel.

Assessing the lighting in each area of your home will give you a quick idea where to bring in more light.

Rooms with abundant windows greatly benefit from natural light, as your home will be seen during the day.

Supplemental light is necessary for rooms with smaller
windows or little natural light coming in.

Increase the wattage of light bulbs in your lamps to improve artificial light.

As a rule of thumb, there should be 100 watts for each 50 square feet of space.

Keep in mind that there are three kinds of lighting.

General lighting or overhead is typically ambient.

The pendant light is good for tasks like food preparation or reading.

Accent lights are usually on tables or mounted on walls.

You can use all three to bring out the best your home has to offer.

Key areas, such as foyers, can set the stage by impressing buyers with a dramatic light source.

If you do not have an abundance of natural light coming in, a chandelier-type light works if your ceilings are high.

Otherwise, wall sconces are impressive in smaller spaces.

Don't assume you need to buy new fixtures if you can update your existing ones.

The aim is to make sure each area of your home is effectively lit.

Kitchen and bathrooms are pivotal rooms to any home seller.

These two areas can make or break a sale.

The combination of ambient, natural, and pendant light can bring out the best in your kitchen space.

Mounting track lighting underneath cabinets gives the counters a chance to shine aesthetically and functionally.

Make sure the light over the sink area is sufficient and working properly.

If you have a hood over the stove, install clear bulbs to ensure the brightest light.

Lighting in the bathroom needs to be intense without being harsh.

Soft lighting enhances any part of the house you want to highlight .

Avoid harsh lighting in the bedrooms as well.

Lamps strategically placed will give the bedrooms a peaceful, restful feel.

The closet light should be bright, though.

One last tip: Lightly painted rooms still need sufficient light so the room doesn't appear drab.

Flooring Plan

Although you don't want home shoppers looking down on your home, they will be looking down at what is under their feet.

Your home's value can be downgraded by the buyer if your floors are in bad shape.

On the flip side, if your home's flooring is well done and in excellent condition, buyers will pay more for it.

Maximizing your profit without compromising your investment dollars is certainly the goal, but if your flooring and carpeting are not in salable shape, you need to take inventory.

There is no point in spending money unnecessarily if the improvements do not add significant value or help the home sell more quickly, but you do have options that don't break the budget .

Repairing and thorough cleaning of your floors are the least expensive way.

Take stock of your home's flooring by examining all the floors. Move furniture out of the way and make notes regarding condition, stains, or blemishes.

Write down what needs to be replaced, cleaned, or repaired.

Carpets can be steam cleaned to eliminate stains and odors.

If the carpets are path-worn and dull, you can replace them easily with other kinds of flooring with a reasonable ROI, although carpeting does make a room feel cozy.

Laminate floors can be cosmetically fixed with repair kits found at home improvement stores.

Hardwood flooring can be easily refinished if the wood is worn or water damaged.

Seek the advice of a flooring professional because real wood floors add a level of quality to a home that laminate floors cannot.

Tips for Kitchen and Bath
When you're making upgrades to your kitchen and bath, what constitutes a substantial investment?

The key is to consider the mass appeal for the sake of resale value.

One homeowner decided to add a backsplash and more cabinet space in the kitchen.

They also updated the appliances and refinished the oak flooring.

Total cost? Eight thousand dollars.

The seller kept the price comparable to sales in the area and ending up selling for $54,000 more than the asking price because interested buyers started a bidding war.

You do not need to bust your budget to sell your home, but you do want to have mass appeal.

Kitchens are pivotal in home appeal.

What can be done to your kitchen and bath to impress buyers without losing ROI?

•Paint neutral colors as discussed earlier.

•Add a new backsplash in kitchen.

•Install new countertops if yours are dated or if you need to bring the home up to current standards in your area.

•New, multifunctional kitchen faucets have mass appeal.

•Add cabinet space or increase storage in the pantry.

•Replace dated bathroom vanities. Pedestal sinks or trendy cabinet sinks have mass appeal.

•Replace toilet seats.

Two Energy-saving Upgrades to Lower Utility Bills

•Install an energy-saving smart thermostat that saves on utility bills for less than $300.

•Install solar vents ($500-$700) in the attic space that help expel hot air during summer months.

Making a Case for Space

According to the National Association of Realtors®, a majority of recent home buyers would have preferred improved and greater closet space, as well as other storage options.

When people accumulate an abundance of possessions, they need the space to store it all.

They also want a way to clear the clutter.

Consider these statistics showing what buyers are looking for in a home:

•93% wanted a laundry room

•90% wanted a bathroom linen closet

•86% wanted garage storage

•85% wanted a walk-in kitchen pantry

Storage Is a Plus

Give buyers great storage and you've won their hearts.

If you can add new closets to your home easily, take the opportunity to do so.

Building a simple closet is not difficult if you are moderately handy.

If you are selling an older home, where closet space is typically at a minimum, this will help!

If your rooms are already small, you might not want to take any square footage away from them Existing closets can be updated to maximize the space at hand.

If you do not have the skills or the funds to hire someone to build new space, consider investing in closet organizers to make the most of what space you have.

For instance:
•You can easily design your custom closet kit online with a storage solution company like ClosetMaid.

•Your standard superstore or hardware store often has exactly what you need in an inexpensive, prefabricated form Organizers will not enlarge your closets, but maximizing vertical and horizontal space is a good alternative

Don't stop there, after all, storage is not restricted to closets.

Storage improvement opportunities apply to all of your cabinets, clothes closets, linen closets, and attic and basement spaces.

It is important to make sure you organize your cabinets.

The same retailers that provide closet organizers can help you with this.

Take a good look at your laundry room and linen closet.

Adding extra shelving in these places can make a big impact.

Look for any place you can provide attractive and inexpensive storage space.

Make sure your improvements are tasteful, and you will benefit from increased storage solutions.

Updating your home with ROI in mind is the best approach in the decision-making process when getting your home ready to sell.

Look over this recent list of what buyers want in a home.

Compare it to what you have in yours, and upgrade accordingly without surpassing the price line for comparable homes in your area.

Features Most Home Buyers Want

•Energy Star-rated appliances — 94%

•Laundry room — 93%

•Energy Star rating for the whole home — 91%

•Exhaust fan in bathroom — 90%

•Exterior lighting — 90%

•Bathroom linen closet — 90%

•Energy Star-rated windows — 89%

•Ceiling fans — 88%

•Garage storage — 86%

•Table space for eating in kitchen — 85%

•Walk-in kitchen pantry — 85%

Keep in mind these features that will not necessarily be effective or profitable upgrades.

Features Fewer Buyers Want

•Only a shower stall in master bath — 51 %

•Two-story family room — 43%

•Wine cooler — 42%

•Wet bar —41%

•Laminate countertop — 40%

•Laundry chute — 32%

•Outdoor kitchen — 31 %

•Game room — 3 %

•His & her baths —31%

• Glass-front cabinets — 31 %

Once your curb appeal draws them in, you must make sure the interior of your home keeps them interested.

In the next chapter, you will learn what can repel home buyers.

The most successful home sellers spent time and effort depersonalizing, de-cluttering, and deep cleaning their homes.

 

 
Read full post

Selling your home in a Divorce

Chapter 7
7 STAGING WITH PURPOSE

This strategy is effective in any market.

No matter what type of home property is being listed, this approach works.

It applies equally to single-family houses, apartments, townhouses, and condos.

Agents and sellers using this tactic have a greater chance of selling the property for more money.

Staging is the act of sprucing up a home to make it as visually appealing as possible.

It does take extra time and work, but the payoff is well worth the effort Staging is one of the most effective marketing tools to sell homes for more money.

In today's competitive real estate market, selling your home requires hard work and dedication.

If you are a motivated seller, this is where you can bring your home to the marketing forefront.

Creating an eye-appealing home, i.e., staging, one potential buyers can envision living in, is the best investment of your time and effort.

Staging your home will:

•Distinguish it from the competition

•Attract top dollars from home buyers

•Give you a visual edge over the competition

How powerful is staging when selling a home?

Consider these results from surveys conducted by Coldwell Banker and the National Association of Realtors®.

•Staged homes spent 50% less time on the market than nonstaged homes.

•Staged homes sold for more than 6% above asking price.

•A staging investment of 1% to 3% of asking price generates a return on investment of between 8% and 10%.

•Homes staged prior to listing sold 79% faster than homes staged after listing.

A real estate agent discovered the secret strategy by accident when he met a wealthy executive who wanted to sell his condo.

He was willing to hire the agent but on one condition.

The real estate agent must agree to use the man's secret method to sell the condo.

The agent was naturally skeptical, but he knew selling the condo would bring a handsome commission.

Conversely, if it did not work out their agreement would expire, and the agent could walkaway.

The real estate agent decided to give it a shot and listed the condo.

They priced the condo at $954,900 even though two similar condos in the same complex were listed for $879,000 and $839,000.

The agent was not confident that the condo would sell for the $954,900 price.

On the other hand, the owner's secret strategy was intriguing. The condo went on the market, and the agent waited to see what would happen.

He began to doubt the strategy as he was showing the condo regularly, but without any offers.

People were walking through and leaving.

To make matters worse, most visiting agents thought the condo was overpriced.

They could not understand why the owner was asking for so much money.

After all, a similar condo around the corner was available for $100,000 less!

They counseled their buyers to keep looking and left without making offers.

The condo had no special features that set it apart from the others.

This unit was not a penthouse. It was on the sixth floor of a 10-story complex.

The other agents were correct to say the price was too high.

Still, the owner stood firm Four months and many showings later, a buyer walked in who loved the condo the moment he stepped through the door.

He made an offer before he finished the tour.

The agent was so excited that he rushed to call the owner.


The owner accepted the man's offer and sold close to listing price.

The condo successfully sold for $949,000, which was a record high!

The strategy they used was a huge success.

Naturally, the real estate agent was excited, and the owner was thrilled he had made a substantial profit.

The price was $110,000 higher than a condo that had sold two and a half months earlier.

The higher price was not due to the current market.

The next unit that sold (28 days later) went for $835,000.

It was a less desirable second-floor unit.

Five months later, another similar condo sold for $850,000.

What is the secret strategy to selling a home for more money?

What was the special request the wealthy home seller had for his agent?

It was simple.

He insisted that the condo be staged.

The successful real estate agent knew he was onto something.

He began researching everything he could find on staging's impact on the selling prices of homes.

He collected his findings and shared the tactics the wealthy seller had taught him.

He included all the examples he had found as case studies.

Many agents already encouraged sellers to stage their homes.

However, few of them knew of the following case study proving staging is an effective method of selling your home for more money.

The following is an excerpt from his report, with one of the case studies he recorded.

Staging - vs - Non-Staged Case Study & Report

Dear Reader,

I wanted to give you the most convincing proof possible.

Many people find it hard to believe the simple act of staging helps one home sell for more than another similar home.

In my research, I looked for examples of similar houses being sold for differing amounts of money where only one of the two houses were staged.

The clearest example I could find was in the case of these two listings.

This development has 200 equivalent townhouses.

Every single townhome in the neighborhood is three stories with three bedrooms and three bathrooms.

Every single unit has the same floor plan.

I looked for two sales there, and found these:

•4438 Capital Dome Drive sold on August 26.

•4456 Capital Dome Drive (5 doors down) sold on July 26, for 40,000 dollars less.

I visited this neighborhood, and I am familiar with these properties.

You could not find a better example of two identical properties that sold for different prices.

The details show these two homes are identical in every substantial way:

•The lots the units sit on are identical as far as the desirableness of the location.

•Both units had the same kitchen plan with the same cabinets and a tile floor.

•Both units had nice hardwood floors in the living room and carpeted bedrooms.

Every important detail of these two townhouses was identical. I studied every aspect of these sales to find what made the difference.

There are two reasons one home sold for $40,000 more than the other:

•Townhouse #4438 was professionally staged, giving it a more appealing appearance.

•The agent selling #4438 took higher quality, more attractive photos of the home.

Those two seemingly small actions made the $40,000 difference!

The buyers of #4438 made a higher offer because the agent presented the home in a more appealing and attractive way.

*B Curry, Realtor.

Used with the permission of the author.

--End of staging report—

What Do Buyers Want?

Most home shoppers are looking for a home that represents a fresh start.

If they can envision living in your home, it will be easier to sell.

Think of it as interior curb appeal, where their eyes are drawn to the inviting space and light as well as the unique features of your home.

Each room in your home needs a purpose or a suggested use.

Each room needs to feel new to reflect ease of upkeep.

By painting, updating fixtures, and eliminating stained carpets and popcorn ceilings, you can improve the saleabilityof your home by 75%!

High-end replacements are not necessary, your goal is to create a clean, simple, and contemporary feel to your home.

Neutralize for Eye Appeal
In the process of staging your home, you must remove distractions so the home shopper can imagine living in each space of your house.

One of the most effective ways to appeal to the buyer is to paint every room in a neutral color.

A wide range of neutrals from soft grays to warm beiges is readily available at any home improvement center.

Dark or bold wall colors can dampen interest in a home if used in large spaces but can be used effectively as accent colors.

Painting the interior not only gives newness to your home, but it can also make it appear more spacious.

By using the same color in visibly adjacent rooms, your house will have a seamless look and uninterrupted flow.

You can also create the illusion of more space by changing your window coverings to match the walls.

Focus on Furniture - Less Is More

Staging is the art of creating a visibly inviting space.

Like any homeowner, you will take your furniture with you when you move out of your home.

Until then, your personal taste and style will be showcased while your home is on the market.

In upcoming chapters, you will learn about depersonalizing your home, but first, we'll examine the concept of creating space by keeping furniture to a minimum.

Buyers are attracted to homes flooded with light and roominess.

They are equally repelled by homes filled with cramped and unnavigable spaces.

Remove all unnecessary furniture from your living spaces.


Store them elsewhere while your home is on the market.

Home shoppers want to walk through your home without obstacles in the way.

Space and storage are high on the list of buyers' requests, so every area of your home should feel spacious.

All closets, pantries, and storage rooms must be free from clutter and look organized.

By pruning back on what fills up space and relegating it to a storage unit, your home will create interest by showcasing space and storage.

Furniture placement is an easy way to highlight unique features of your home.

A grouping of chairs in front of a fireplace, for example, will draw attention to it.

Avoid pushing the furniture close to the walls.

Reposition easy chairs into floating group spaces.

Every room has to be staged to show function as well.

An empty room used for overflow of boxes, possessions, or unwanted items should be transformed into a usable, desirable space.

Clean it out and create an office space with a desk and chair or a reading room with a lamp and recliner.

If you have exercise equipment, feature it as a workout room.

Furniture pieces such as tables can be taken from the living room for use in other rooms.

Every room should have a purpose and be user-friendly.

Make your home's traffic flow obvious so buyers can browse each room without effort.

Emotional Cues

Once every room has a purpose, creating atmosphere is key to making your home desirable.

Decorative touches like greenery, flowers, and lit candles can give life to your home.

Wall art creatively hung will frame rooms.

A bedroom that has one bed with one pillow and blanket will make the room seem bare and lonely.

By adding a table with decor and a rocking chair draped with a lap robe, you heighten its appeal.

Make sure to add elements of the same color, shape, or texture to unify the room Any splashes of bold color should appear in the wall art or any place you want to draw attention.

Learn to strike a balance between staging and living in your home.

You can seasonally decorate your home without dashing your appeal.

The main goal is to keep your home clean and free of "stuff' that distracts would-be buyers.

Even simple things can make a big impact on the final sale price of a home.

Staging done well is one of those things!

You have two options for staging a home:

Option 1: Do it yourself.

Option 2: Hire a professional home stager.

If you are considering hiring someone to handle your staging, contact me for a list of references.

I'd be happy to share recommendations and send you information on stagers who will do a good job for you.

In the next few chapters, you will learn how to prepare for staging.

Remember, first impressions are important.

The time and effort you put into creating great ones will pay off when you sell your home quickly and for more money!

 

 

Selling your home in a Divorce

Chapter 7
7 STAGING WITH PURPOSE

This strategy is effective in any market.

No matter what type of home property is being listed, this approach works.

It applies equally to single-family houses, apartments, townhouses, and condos.

Agents and sellers using this tactic have a greater chance of selling the property for more money.

Staging is the act of sprucing up a home to make it as visually appealing as possible.

It does take extra time and work, but the payoff is well worth the effort Staging is one of the most effective marketing tools to sell homes for more money.

In today's competitive real estate market, selling your home requires hard work and dedication.

If you are a motivated seller, this is where you can bring your home to the marketing forefront.

Creating an eye-appealing home, i.e., staging, one potential buyers can envision living in, is the best investment of your time and effort.

Staging your home will:

•Distinguish it from the competition

•Attract top dollars from home buyers

•Give you a visual edge over the competition

How powerful is staging when selling a home?

Consider these results from surveys conducted by Coldwell Banker and the National Association of Realtors®.

•Staged homes spent 50% less time on the market than nonstaged homes.

•Staged homes sold for more than 6% above asking price.

•A staging investment of 1% to 3% of asking price generates a return on investment of between 8% and 10%.

•Homes staged prior to listing sold 79% faster than homes staged after listing.

A real estate agent discovered the secret strategy by accident when he met a wealthy executive who wanted to sell his condo.

He was willing to hire the agent but on one condition.

The real estate agent must agree to use the man's secret method to sell the condo.

The agent was naturally skeptical, but he knew selling the condo would bring a handsome commission.

Conversely, if it did not work out their agreement would expire, and the agent could walkaway.

The real estate agent decided to give it a shot and listed the condo.

They priced the condo at $954,900 even though two similar condos in the same complex were listed for $879,000 and $839,000.

The agent was not confident that the condo would sell for the $954,900 price.

On the other hand, the owner's secret strategy was intriguing. The condo went on the market, and the agent waited to see what would happen.

He began to doubt the strategy as he was showing the condo regularly, but without any offers.

People were walking through and leaving.

To make matters worse, most visiting agents thought the condo was overpriced.

They could not understand why the owner was asking for so much money.

After all, a similar condo around the corner was available for $100,000 less!

They counseled their buyers to keep looking and left without making offers.

The condo had no special features that set it apart from the others.

This unit was not a penthouse. It was on the sixth floor of a 10-story complex.

The other agents were correct to say the price was too high.

Still, the owner stood firm Four months and many showings later, a buyer walked in who loved the condo the moment he stepped through the door.

He made an offer before he finished the tour.

The agent was so excited that he rushed to call the owner.


The owner accepted the man's offer and sold close to listing price.

The condo successfully sold for $949,000, which was a record high!

The strategy they used was a huge success.

Naturally, the real estate agent was excited, and the owner was thrilled he had made a substantial profit.

The price was $110,000 higher than a condo that had sold two and a half months earlier.

The higher price was not due to the current market.

The next unit that sold (28 days later) went for $835,000.

It was a less desirable second-floor unit.

Five months later, another similar condo sold for $850,000.

What is the secret strategy to selling a home for more money?

What was the special request the wealthy home seller had for his agent?

It was simple.

He insisted that the condo be staged.

The successful real estate agent knew he was onto something.

He began researching everything he could find on staging's impact on the selling prices of homes.

He collected his findings and shared the tactics the wealthy seller had taught him.

He included all the examples he had found as case studies.

Many agents already encouraged sellers to stage their homes.

However, few of them knew of the following case study proving staging is an effective method of selling your home for more money.

The following is an excerpt from his report, with one of the case studies he recorded.

Staging - vs - Non-Staged Case Study & Report

Dear Reader,

I wanted to give you the most convincing proof possible.

Many people find it hard to believe the simple act of staging helps one home sell for more than another similar home.

In my research, I looked for examples of similar houses being sold for differing amounts of money where only one of the two houses were staged.

The clearest example I could find was in the case of these two listings.

This development has 200 equivalent townhouses.

Every single townhome in the neighborhood is three stories with three bedrooms and three bathrooms.

Every single unit has the same floor plan.

I looked for two sales there, and found these:

•4438 Capital Dome Drive sold on August 26.

•4456 Capital Dome Drive (5 doors down) sold on July 26, for 40,000 dollars less.

I visited this neighborhood, and I am familiar with these properties.

You could not find a better example of two identical properties that sold for different prices.

The details show these two homes are identical in every substantial way:

•The lots the units sit on are identical as far as the desirableness of the location.

•Both units had the same kitchen plan with the same cabinets and a tile floor.

•Both units had nice hardwood floors in the living room and carpeted bedrooms.

Every important detail of these two townhouses was identical. I studied every aspect of these sales to find what made the difference.

There are two reasons one home sold for $40,000 more than the other:

•Townhouse #4438 was professionally staged, giving it a more appealing appearance.

•The agent selling #4438 took higher quality, more attractive photos of the home.

Those two seemingly small actions made the $40,000 difference!

The buyers of #4438 made a higher offer because the agent presented the home in a more appealing and attractive way.

*B Curry, Realtor.

Used with the permission of the author.

--End of staging report—

What Do Buyers Want?

Most home shoppers are looking for a home that represents a fresh start.

If they can envision living in your home, it will be easier to sell.

Think of it as interior curb appeal, where their eyes are drawn to the inviting space and light as well as the unique features of your home.

Each room in your home needs a purpose or a suggested use.

Each room needs to feel new to reflect ease of upkeep.

By painting, updating fixtures, and eliminating stained carpets and popcorn ceilings, you can improve the saleabilityof your home by 75%!

High-end replacements are not necessary, your goal is to create a clean, simple, and contemporary feel to your home.

Neutralize for Eye Appeal
In the process of staging your home, you must remove distractions so the home shopper can imagine living in each space of your house.

One of the most effective ways to appeal to the buyer is to paint every room in a neutral color.

A wide range of neutrals from soft grays to warm beiges is readily available at any home improvement center.

Dark or bold wall colors can dampen interest in a home if used in large spaces but can be used effectively as accent colors.

Painting the interior not only gives newness to your home, but it can also make it appear more spacious.

By using the same color in visibly adjacent rooms, your house will have a seamless look and uninterrupted flow.

You can also create the illusion of more space by changing your window coverings to match the walls.

Focus on Furniture - Less Is More

Staging is the art of creating a visibly inviting space.

Like any homeowner, you will take your furniture with you when you move out of your home.

Until then, your personal taste and style will be showcased while your home is on the market.

In upcoming chapters, you will learn about depersonalizing your home, but first, we'll examine the concept of creating space by keeping furniture to a minimum.

Buyers are attracted to homes flooded with light and roominess.

They are equally repelled by homes filled with cramped and unnavigable spaces.

Remove all unnecessary furniture from your living spaces.


Store them elsewhere while your home is on the market.

Home shoppers want to walk through your home without obstacles in the way.

Space and storage are high on the list of buyers' requests, so every area of your home should feel spacious.

All closets, pantries, and storage rooms must be free from clutter and look organized.

By pruning back on what fills up space and relegating it to a storage unit, your home will create interest by showcasing space and storage.

Furniture placement is an easy way to highlight unique features of your home.

A grouping of chairs in front of a fireplace, for example, will draw attention to it.

Avoid pushing the furniture close to the walls.

Reposition easy chairs into floating group spaces.

Every room has to be staged to show function as well.

An empty room used for overflow of boxes, possessions, or unwanted items should be transformed into a usable, desirable space.

Clean it out and create an office space with a desk and chair or a reading room with a lamp and recliner.

If you have exercise equipment, feature it as a workout room.

Furniture pieces such as tables can be taken from the living room for use in other rooms.

Every room should have a purpose and be user-friendly.

Make your home's traffic flow obvious so buyers can browse each room without effort.

Emotional Cues

Once every room has a purpose, creating atmosphere is key to making your home desirable.

Decorative touches like greenery, flowers, and lit candles can give life to your home.

Wall art creatively hung will frame rooms.

A bedroom that has one bed with one pillow and blanket will make the room seem bare and lonely.

By adding a table with decor and a rocking chair draped with a lap robe, you heighten its appeal.

Make sure to add elements of the same color, shape, or texture to unify the room Any splashes of bold color should appear in the wall art or any place you want to draw attention.

Learn to strike a balance between staging and living in your home.

You can seasonally decorate your home without dashing your appeal.

The main goal is to keep your home clean and free of "stuff' that distracts would-be buyers.

Even simple things can make a big impact on the final sale price of a home.

Staging done well is one of those things!

You have two options for staging a home:

Option 1: Do it yourself.

Option 2: Hire a professional home stager.

If you are considering hiring someone to handle your staging, contact me for a list of references.

I'd be happy to share recommendations and send you information on stagers who will do a good job for you.

In the next few chapters, you will learn how to prepare for staging.

Remember, first impressions are important.

The time and effort you put into creating great ones will pay off when you sell your home quickly and for more money!

 

            Strathmore Best Realtor
 
 
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